Comprehension Disorder

Comprehension disorder is a challenge where a person has difficulty understanding the meaning of words and passages of a written piece, as well as having difficulty learning to read, speak, and comprehend words. 

Comprehension Disorder

How We Can Help

We can help you deal with your child’s comprehension disorder by undertaking an assessment to identify the reading comprehension issues that your child has, and designing and implementing a therapy plan to help them with this problem.

Our assessment involves undertaking learning disability diagnostic reading tests to determine the types of problems that are affecting your child’s reading skills. We also observe and analyse your child’s work, do cognitive tests, and language evaluations.

Our therapy involves developing individualised plans that comprise games and fun to help the child improve their performance in the areas identified by the assessment. We employ various strategies to help the child, including the graphic organisation of written messages, one-on-one reading instruction, oral language training, and pre-reading tasks and exercises. We particularly support children and their parents on how to cope with the challenge, including reaching out to teachers to discuss the child’s situation and the possibilities for individualised education plans.

There may be situations when we recommend that a psychologist or neuropsychologist determine the extent of your child’s comprehension disorder.

How Comprehension Disorder Manifests

Comprehension disorder is characterised by difficulties with fundamental reading abilities such as word recognition, difficulty understanding the major concepts in passages being read, frequent dissatisfaction with reading assignments, and difficulty recalling essential parts of what has been read. 

Causes And Impacts Of Comprehension Disorder

Comprehension disorder has been associated with a number of causal and risk factors. These are:

  • Brain development challenges

People that have particular reading comprehension deficiencies tend to have less gray matter in regions of the brain that govern language processing and executive functioning, both of which are related to reading.

  • Autism

Some autistic children exhibit hyperlexia, which means they are early readers who can decode words without problem but have poor reading comprehension.

  • Dyslexia

People with this learning disability typically struggle with decoding or linking printed text to spoken language. Whereas some persons with dyslexia may not struggle with comprehension, others struggle to completely comprehend a written material due to their sluggish or disconnected reading rate.

  • Poor early vocabulary skills

Children who can read proficiently but struggle to understand the essence of a written text may fall behind their peers in fundamental vocabulary abilities.

  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Children who can read proficiently but struggle to understand the content of a written paragraph may fall behind their peers in fundamental vocabulary abilities. People with ADHD may also difficulty with reading comprehension, which is likely due to working memory issues. People with ADHD may also difficulty with reading comprehension, which is likely due to working memory issues.